• February 14, 2024

We investigated how the change from current generation to next-generation pMDI propellants might affect the technical performance of currently used pMDI hardware, with a focus on actuator designs that assist with achievement of in vitro equivalence. The key finding of the preliminary in vitro studies described is that the changes required to convert pMDI formulations […]

  • October 17, 2023

In this opinion article, Inhalation talks with Alex Wilkinson and Gregor Anderson about aspects of a potential sustainability roadmap for inhalation platforms that could lead to reaching the UK’s National Health Service net zero goal. They believe that while new propellants are a major step forward, much more work must be done to meet this […]

  • February 11, 2022

This article describes legislative and commercial drivers for propellant change and potential propellants, as well as the Respitab® technology platform, which provides a novel approach to formulation and manufacturing of lower global warning potential (GWP) pMDIs. Studies are presented and manufacturing and considerations for its use are discussed. There is a clear need for alternatives […]

  • June 9, 2021

There is a need to adopt more environmentally friendly pMDI propellants, not only to reduce carbon footprint, but also to mitigate supply issues that may result from the decline in the use of existing propellants. HFA-152a and HFO-1234ze(E) are two potential candidates. It is critical that drug developers and manufacturers prepare their facilities for the […]

As the inhalation community explores propellants with lower global warming potential that could be used in pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs), we hear the term “Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol.” But how does that differ from the Paris Agreement? A useful explanation is shown in this table, reprinted with kind permission of the Montreal […]

  • November 17, 2017

In the case of formulations under development for indications such as pain management, migraine, seizure and biologics such as vaccines, which require a delivery system with precision control over spray plume geometry and deposition to the nasal mucosa for systemic uptake, pharmaceutical manufacturers have turned their attention to unit-dose, aseptic intranasal drug products. This type […]

  • November 16, 2017

The second in a series of articles on the history of DPI capsules. Part 1 appeared in the December, 2008 issue of Inhalation.